1.3 Leader Follower Behaviors and Crisis Leadership Response

 Mary Wright

The most recent crisis experienced in my firm was two years ago when the Covid-19 pandemic shut down most of the United States and other countries worldwide. Our CEO went into crisis mode with routine communication in varying formats. We received emails, videos, webcasts, and Town Hall forums. The firm was completely transparent with its plan to emerge from the pandemic stronger than when we entered it. We faced a challenge for adaptability and were taught to embrace the chaos. The firm provided us several outlets for support for mental needs, and it established networks for parents suddenly facing home-schooling their children along with the requirements of their jobs. Our CEO was sure to impart that the firm would weather the crisis by staying focused on maintaining safety and work-life balance for their workforce. We were already well-positioned to weather the epidemic as we were already equipped most of our workforce to operate remotely. The most difficult challenge was staying connected virtually since we were no longer working out of our office locations together. The impact was highly positive. We broke even the first year of the pandemic when we were confident we would fall short of our financial goals. We even profited some. These profits were passed on to the workforce as bonus payments.

I believe in times of crisis; leadership faces the same basic physiological response of “fight or flight” that is hard-wired in each of us. A leader that shies away from the spotlight during hard times and won’t communicate or offer any transparency will not garner much confidence from their workforce or the community in which they operate. Leaders must confront the situation boldly, adapt to the challenges, and engage with their teams (Nichols et al., 2020). Conversely, a leader who confronts the crisis head-on and seeks advantages where we can grow despite the setback will be viewed as honest and upfront about developments along the way. Confrontation and adaptation will bolster the trust within the workforce, and the community and the organization will emerge from the crisis stronger than ever. Leaders should understand their behavioral drives and continue to re-familiarize themselves with these drives. They can sometimes backfire during an emergency if the situation is not suited for their style of response (Barks, n.d.).

 

References

Barks, A. (n.d.). The behavioral mistake leaders make in crisis. The Predictive Index. https://www.predictiveindex.com/blog/the-behavioral-mistake-leaders-make-in-crisis/

Nichols, C., Hayden, S., & Trendler, C. (2020, August 2). 4 Behaviors That Help Leaders Manage a Crisis. Harvard Business Review. 

1.3 Leader Follower Behaviors and Crisis Leadership Response

Larry Upshaw posted

One example that comes to mind is and injury that took place during an active shooter drill at my organization. A staff member was shot in the eye with a rubber bullet and was very hurt. The principal at the time completely ignored the teachers feelings and injury. She went on with the drill expressing the level of importance of being ready and prepared for whatever may come working in schools in this day and time. As a leader, you should never dismiss an employee's feelings. It is a moral killer! 

All leaders should practice boosting the moral of the workers, showing them that you care and are human. Connected to them in personal manner. Having your moral low will not only ruin your flow but run good workers off. If you have no staff lead than you are not a good leader. 

Leaders should practice moral building throughout the year to show the staff that you not only care about the success of the company but the success of them as a person. Having high moral will allow you and your team to excel in ways you could not imagine. Take for example the moral that Former President trump had to deal with! It could not have been good. 

                                                                            References

1.3 Leader Follower Behaviors and Crisis

Leadershi

p

R

esponse

Mary Wright

The

most

recent

crisis

experienced

in

my

firm

was

two

years

ago

when

the

Covid

19

pandemic

shut

down

most

of

the

United

States

and

other

countries

worldwide.

Our

CEO

went

into

crisis

mode

with

routine

communication

in

varying

formats.

We

received

emails,

v

ideos,

webcasts,

and

Town

Hall

forums.

The

firm

was

completely

transparent

with

its

plan

to

emerge

from

the

pandemic

stronger

than

when

we

entered

it.

We

faced

a

challenge

for

adaptability

and

were

taught

to

embrace

the

chaos.

The

firm

provided

us

several

outlets

for

support

for

mental

needs,

and

it

established

networks

for

parents

suddenly

facing

home

schooling

their

children

along

with

the

requirements

of

their

jobs.

Our

CEO

was

sure

to

impart

that

the

firm

would

weather

the

crisis

by

staying

focused

on

m

aintaining

safety

and

work

life

balance

for

their

workforce.

We

were

already

well

positioned

to

weather

the

epidemic

as

we

were

already

equipped

most

of

our

workforce

to

operate

remotely.

The

most

difficult

challenge

was

staying

connected

virtually

since

w

e

were

no

longer

working

out

of

our

office

locations

together.

The

impact

was

highly

positive.

We

broke

even

the

first

year

of

the

pandemic

when

we

were

confident

we

would

fall

short

of

our

financial

goals.

We

even

profited

some.

These

profits

were

passed

on

to

the

workforce

as

bonus

payments.

I

believe

in

times

of

crisis;

leadership

faces

the

same

basic

physiological

response

of

“fight

or

flight”

that

is

hard

wired

in

each

of

us.

A

leader

that

shies

away

from

the

spotlight

during

hard

times

and

won’t

commu

nicate

or

offer

any

transparency

will

not

garner

much

confidence

from

their

workforce

or

the

community

in

which

they

operate.

Leaders

must

confront

the

situation

boldly,

adapt

to

the

challenges,

and

engage

with

their

teams

(

Nichols

et

al.

,

2020

).

Conversel

y,

a

leader

who

confronts

the

crisis

head

on

and

seeks

advantages

where

we

can

grow

despite

the

setback

will

be

viewed

as

honest

and

upfront

about

developments

along

the

way.

Confrontation

and

adaptation

will

bolster

the

trust

within

the

workforce,

and

1.3 Leader Follower Behaviors and Crisis

Leadership Response

Mary Wright

The most recent crisis experienced in my firm was two years ago when the Covid-19

pandemic shut down most of the United States and other countries worldwide. Our CEO went

into crisis mode with routine communication in varying formats. We received emails, videos,

webcasts, and Town Hall forums. The firm was completely transparent with its plan to emerge

from the pandemic stronger than when we entered it. We faced a challenge for adaptability

and were taught to embrace the chaos. The firm provided us several outlets for support for

mental needs, and it established networks for parents suddenly facing home-schooling their

children along with the requirements of their jobs. Our CEO was sure to impart that the firm

would weather the crisis by staying focused on maintaining safety and work-life balance for

their workforce. We were already well-positioned to weather the epidemic as we were already

equipped most of our workforce to operate remotely. The most difficult challenge was staying

connected virtually since we were no longer working out of our office locations together. The

impact was highly positive. We broke even the first year of the pandemic when we were

confident we would fall short of our financial goals. We even profited some. These profits

were passed on to the workforce as bonus payments.

I believe in times of crisis; leadership faces the same basic physiological response of

“fight or flight” that is hard-wired in each of us. A leader that shies away from the spotlight

during hard times and won’t communicate or offer any transparency will not garner much

confidence from their workforce or the community in which they operate. Leaders must

confront the situation boldly, adapt to the challenges, and engage with their teams (Nichols et

al., 2020). Conversely, a leader who confronts the crisis head-on and seeks advantages where

we can grow despite the setback will be viewed as honest and upfront about developments

along the way. Confrontation and adaptation will bolster the trust within the workforce, and

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